Christian Guttmann: AI is the most disruptive technology for decades to come. It aint gonna be boring.

Christian Guttmann was recently named one of the top 100 leaders in the field of AI. AI is one of the top technologies that we’re focussing on this year at 4YFN19. The ethics of AI is one of the most pressing issues associated with the development of this powerful new field of technology, which is why we are very excited to hear a panel at 10:20 on 27 February on the Garden Stage with Christian to discuss the implications of AI.

Here we caught up with Christian briefly to find out about the exciting future of AI and how it will impact society.

What are you talking about at the conference?

I will be talking about Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning

What are you passionate about?

I have dedicated my life and career to Artificial Intelligence – it is perhaps the ultimate vehicle to really understand ourselves as humans. Following the principle: “you can engineer only what you understand.”

What is the future of your field?

AI is the most disruptive technology for decades to come. It aint gonna be boring.

Why is it so important?

We will benefit greatly from narrow AI which will solve significant societal and economic challenges, such as a cure for cancer, energy and food access, and poverty. The wider goal is to build AGI – Artificial General Intelligence.

What are your favourite sayings (they can be your own)? Words to live by?

“I calculated recently that we have about 300000 AI business opportunities and AI use cases today and there will be many more in the future. The most important question here is: how do you position your company to seize the most valuable ones to compete successfully in today’s economy.”

“Artificial Intelligence will substantially contribute to the increase of revenue, reduction of cost and the minimisation of risk – the question will be in which area of your company were contributing.”

“You can’t do anything better when everything you are doing is a success, because you won’t learn from failures.”

What does the world look like in 50-100 years?

We will not work for income, but for the human value that we create. The focus will be on how creative and imaginative we are.